Best commercials of 2011

by umer | 2:06 AM in , |

Best commercials of 2011

Best commercials of 2011_ Many people groaned last winter when it became clear that Super Bowl XLV would be packed bumper to bumper with automotive ads. It's not a category that's exactly wowed with its creativity in recent years.
It was a pleasant surprise, then, when many of the car spots proved not only tolerable but wonderful. Now, with the year almost passed, it's become clear that two of those ads in particular--Chrysler's "Born of Fire" by Wieden + Kennedy and Volkswagen's "The Force" by Deutsch--weren't just among that evening's best spots. They turned out to be among the year's best.
Many people groaned last winter when it became clear that Super Bowl XLV would be packed bumper to bumper with automotive ads. It's not a category that's exactly wowed with its creativity in recent years. It was a pleasant surprise, then, when many of the car spots proved not only tolerable but wonderful. Now, with the year almost passed, it's become clear that two of those ads in particular—Chrysler's "Born of Fire" by Wieden + Kennedy and Volkswagen's "The Force" by Deutsch—weren't just among that evening's best spots. They turned out to be among the year's best.
Those two ads are joined by a third car commercial, Nissan Leaf's "Gas Powered Everything" by TBWA\Chiat\Day, in Adweek's ranking of The 10 Best Commercials of 2011, presented here. Those auto spots were all expertly conceived and executed, with great atmospherics, details, and flourishes. And interestingly, they're all so different—an environmental appeal in a bleak alternate universe; a rugged defense of Motor City's heritage and pride, featuring a powerful celebrity cameo; and a kid in a Darth Vader mask just trying to exert a little mind control around the house. Together, they represent the best automotive advertising has to offer.
Elsewhere, the list celebrates work across a wide variety of products, themes, styles, and geographies. You've got candy bars and zombies, cats with thumbs, and film-directing bears. You've also got two spots focused on the environment, and two explicitly about the humanizing power of technology—fundamental concerns in an age when our lives, and the world, can feel like they're spinning out of control.